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This Day in History | September 10th

On Sept. 10, 1608, John Smith was elected president of the Jamestown colony council in Virginia.

In 1963, 20 Black students entered Alabama public schools following a standoff between federal authorities and Gov. George C. Wallace.

In 1984, a revival of the TV game show “Jeopardy!” hosted by Alex Trebek premiered in syndication.

In 1998, President Clinton met with members of his Cabinet to apologize, ask forgiveness and promise to improve in the wake of the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

In 2015, New York State approved gradually raising the minimum wage for fast-food workers to $15 an hour— the first time any state had set the minimum that high.

In 2020, Diana Rigg, a British actor whose career included roles in the 1960s spy series “The Avengers” and the fantasy juggernaut “Game of Thrones,” died at the age of 82.

This Day in History | September 9th

On Sept 9, 1893, Frances Cleveland gave birth to a daughter, Esther, in the White House; it was the first (and, to date, only) time a president’s child was born in the executive mansion.

In 1948, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) was declared.In 1956, Elvis Presley made the first of three appearances on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”

In 1960, in the first regular-season American Football League game, the Denver Broncos defeated the Boston Patriots, 13-10.

In 1971, prisoners seized control of the maximum-security Attica Correctional Facility near Buffalo, New York, beginning a siege that ended up claiming 43 lives.

In 2015, Queen Elizabeth II became the longest reigning monarch in British history, serving for 23,226 days, surpassing Queen Victoria, her great-great-grandmother.

This Day in History | September 8th

On Sept. 8, 1504, Michelangelo’s David was unveiled to the public in Florence, Italy.

In 1892, an early version of “The Pledge of Allegiance,” written by Francis Bellamy, appeared in “The Youth’s Companion.”

In 1935, Sen. Huey P. Long, a Louisiana Democrat, was shot and mortally wounded inside the Louisiana State Capitol.

In 1943, during World War II, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower announced Italy’s surrender; Nazi Germany denounced Italy’s decision as a cowardly act.

In 1964, schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia, reopened after being closed for five years by officials attempting to prevent racial desegregation.

In 1968, The Beatles were seen performing ‘Hey Jude’ on the UK television show ‘Frost On Sunday’ in front of an invited audience. The song was the first single from The Beatles‘ record label Apple Records and at over seven minutes in length, ‘Hey Jude’ was, at the time, the longest single ever to top the British charts. It also spent nine weeks as No.1 in the United States—the longest run at the top of the American charts for a Beatles’ single. In 1974, In a controversial executive action, President Gerald Ford pardons his disgraced predecessor Richard M. Nixon for any crimes he may have committed or participated in while in office.

In 1974, in a controversial executive action, President Gerald Ford pardons his disgraced predecessor Richard M. Nixon for any crimes he may have committed or participated in while in office.

In 1984, Stevie Wonder had his first UK No.1 with ‘I Just Called To Say I Love You’. Taken from the film ‘The Woman In Red’, it was 18 years after Wonder’s chart debut in 1966. The song stayed at No.1 for six weeks.

In 2016, California and federal regulators fined Wells Fargo a combined $185 million, alleging the bank’s employees illegally opened millions of unauthorized accounts for their customers.

This Day in History | September 7th

On September 7, 1940, 300 German bombers raid London, in the first of 57 consecutive nights of bombing. This bombing “blitzkrieg” (lightning war) would continue until May 1941.

In 1972, the International Olympic Committee banned Vince Matthews and Wayne Collett from further competition for talking to each other on the victory stand during the playing of the “Star-Spangled Banner” after winning gold and silver in the 400-meter run.

In 1976, ABBA were at No.1 on the UK singles chart with ‘Dancing Queen’, the group’s fourth UK No.1 single and their only US No.1 chart topper. The song was a No.1 hit in over a dozen countries and stayed at the top of the Swedish charts for 14 weeks.

In 1977, in Washington, President Jimmy Carter and Panamanian dictator Omar Torrijos sign a treaty agreeing to transfer control of the Panama Canal from the United States to Panama at the end of the 20th century.

In 1986, Desmond Tutu was installed as the first Black clergyman to lead the Anglican Church in southern Africa.

In 1996, rapper Tupac Shakur was shot and mortally wounded on the Las Vegas Strip.

In 2015, Hillary Clinton said she did not need to apologize for using a private email account and server while at the State Department because “what I did was allowed.”

This Day in History | September 6th


On Sept. 6, 1901, President William McKinley was shot and mortally wounded by Leon Czolgosz in Buffalo, New York.

In 1972, the Summer Olympics resumed in Munich, West Germany, a day after the deadly hostage crisis that claimed the lives of eleven Israelis and five Arab abductors.


In 1975, 18-year-old tennis star Martina Navratilova of Czechoslovakia, in New York for the U.S. Open, requested political asylum in the United States.


In 1991, the Soviet Union recognized the independence of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.


In 1995, Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken broke Lou Gehrig’s record by playing his two-thousand-131st consecutive game.


In 2017, Hurricane Irma, the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic, pounded Puerto Rico.

This Day in History | September 5th

On Sept. 5, 1774, the first Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia.In 1864, voters in Louisiana approved a new state constitution abolishing slavery.

In 1836,, Sam Houston is elected as president of the Republic of Texas, which earned its independence from Mexico in a successful military rebellion.

In 1957, the novel “On the Road,” by Jack Kerouac, was first published.

In 1969, Lt. William Calley is charged with six specifications of premeditated murder in the death of 109 Vietnamese civilians at My Lai in March 1968.

In 1970, Janis Joplin started recording sessions recording a version of the Kris Kristofferson and Fred Foster song ‘Me and Bobby McGee’. Joplin, (who was a lover and a friend of Kristofferson’s from the beginning of her career to her death), topped the US singles chart with the song in 1971 after her death, making the song the second posthumous No.1 single in US chart history after ‘(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay’ by Otis Redding.

In 1972, during the 1972 Summer Olympics at Munich, in the early morning, a group of Palestinian terrorists storms the Olympic Village apartment of the Israeli athletes, killing two and taking nine others hostage.

In 1975, President Gerald R. Ford escaped an attempt on his life by Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, a disciple of Charles Manson, in Sacramento, California.

In 1984, the space shuttle Discovery ended its inaugural flight.

In 2006, Katie Couric makes headlines—and TV history—with her highly publicized debut as the first female solo anchor of a weekday network evening news broadcast, CBS Evening News with Katie Couric.

In 2018, The New York Times published an opinion piece from an anonymous administration official claiming to be part of a“resistance” working to thwart President Donald Trump’s “worst inclinations;” Trump responded that if such a “gutless” person exists, “the Times must, for National Security purposes, turn him/her over to the government at once!”

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