Author: Gordon Jones (Page 2 of 31)

This Day in History | September 17th

On Sept. 17, 1862, more than 3,600 men were killed in the Battle of Antietam.

In 1933, The first long-playing record, a 33 1/3 rpm recording, was demonstrated at the Savoy Plaza Hotel in New York by RCA-Victor. The venture was doomed to fail however due to the high price of the record players, which started around $95 (about $1140 in today’s dollars) and wasn’t revived until 1948.

In 1937, the likeness of President Abraham Lincoln’s head was dedicated at Mount Rushmore.

In 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland during World War II, more than two weeks after Nazi Germany had launched its assault.

In 1954, the novel “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding was first published by Faber & Faber of London.

In 1955, The BBC announced the removal of Bill Haley and His Comets’ ‘Rockin’ Through The Rye’ from its playlist because they felt the song went against traditional British standards, (and included the lyrics “All the lassies rock with me when rockin’ through the rye”). The record, based on an 18th century Scottish Folk tune, was at No.5 on the UK charts.

In 1967, The Doors were banned from The Ed Sullivan Show after Jim Morrison broke his agreement with the show’s producers. Morrison said before the performance that he wouldn’t sing the words, ‘Girl, we couldn’t get much higher,’ from ‘Light My Fire’ but did anyway. The Doors also performed their new single ‘People Are Strange.’

In 1978, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat signed a framework for a peace treaty.

In 1994, Heather Whitestone of Alabama was crowned the first deaf Miss America.

In 2001, six days after 9/11, stock prices nosedived but stopped short of collapse in an emotional, flag-waving reopening of Wall Street.


This Day in History | September 16th

On Sept. 16, 1810, Mexico began its revolt against Spanish rule.

In 1908, William Durant creates General Motors.

In 1967, Jimi Hendrix‘s debut LP, Are You Experienced? entered the Billboard Hot 200 album chart, where it stayed for 106 weeks, including 77 weeks in the Top 40. In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine ranked it No.15 on their 500 Greatest Albums of All Time and two years later it was selected for permanent preservation in the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress in the United States.

In 1932, in his cell at Yerwada Jail in Pune, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi begins a hunger strike in protest of the British government’s decision to separate India’s electoral system by caste.

In 1987, two dozen countries signed the Montreal Protocol, a treaty designed to save the Earth’s ozone layer by calling on nations to reduce emissions by the year 2000.

In 2001, President George W. Bush, speaking on the South Lawn of the White House, said there was “no question” Osama bin Laden and his followers were the prime suspects in the Sept. 11 attacks.

In 2014, President Barack Obama declared that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa could threaten security around the world and ordered 3,000 U.S. troops to the region.

In 2016, Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee, 88, died in New York City.






This Day in History | September 15th

On Sept. 15, 1776, British forces occupied New York City during the American Revolution.

In 1857, William Howard Taft — who served as President of the United States and as U.S. chief justice — was born in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In 1890, English mystery writer Agatha Christie was born in Torquay.

In 1963, four Black girls were killed when a bomb went off at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. (Three Ku Klux Klansmen were eventually convicted.)

In 1981, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously to approve the Supreme Court nomination of Sandra Day O’Connor.

In 1985, Nike began selling its “Air Jordan 1” sneaker.

In 2008, the Dow Jones fell 504.48, or 4.42 percent, to 10,917.51 while oil closed below $100 a barrel for the first time in six months.

This Day in History | September 14th

On Sept. 14, 1836, former Vice President Aaron Burr died in Staten Island, New York, at age 80.

In 1927, modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of the sports car she was riding in.

In 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly film star Grace Kelly, died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash the day before.

In 2011, a government panel released a report saying that BP bore ultimate responsibility for the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

In 2020, in Northern California for a briefing on the wildfires that had killed dozens of people, President Donald Trump dismissed the scientific consensus that climate change was playing a central role in the fires; he renewed his unfounded claim that failure to rake forest floors was to blame.

This Day in History | September 13th

On Sept. 13, 1959, Elvis Presley first met his future wife, 14-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu, while stationed in West Germany with the U.S. Army. (They married in 1967 but divorced in 1973.)

In 1970, the first New York City Marathon was held; winner Gary Muhrcke finished the run, which took place entirely inside Central Park, in 2:31:38.

In 1990, the combination police-courtroom drama “Law & Order” premiered.

In 1993, at the White House, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO chairman Yasser Arafat shook hands after signing an accord granting limited Palestinian autonomy.

In 1998, former Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace died in Montgomery at age 79.

In 2010, Rafael Nadal won his first U.S. Open title to complete a career Grand Slam, beating Novak Djokovic 6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 6-2.

This Day in History | September 12th

On Sept. 12, 1914, during World War I, the First Battle of the Marne ended in an Allied victory.

In 1962, in a speech at Rice University in Houston, President John F. Kennedy reaffirmed his support for the manned space program, declaring: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

In 1966, “Family Affair” premiered on CBS.

In 1994, a stolen, single-engine Cessna crashed into the South Lawn of the White House, coming to rest against the executive mansion; the pilot, Frank Corder, was killed.

In 2008, a Metrolink commuter train struck a freight train head-on in Los Angeles, killing 25 people. (Federal investigators said the Metrolink engineer had been text-messaging on his cell phone and ran a red light shortly before the crash.)

This Day in History | September 11th

On Sept. 11, 1789, Alexander Hamilton was appointed the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.

In 1936, Boulder Dam (now Hoover Dam) began operation as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a key in Washington to signal the startup of the dam’s first hydroelectric generator.

In 1985, Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds cracked career hit number 4,192, eclipsing the record held by Ty Cobb.

In 2001, nearly 3,000 people were killed as 19 al-Qaida hijackers seized control of four jetliners, sending two of the planes into New York’s World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon and the fourth into a field in western Pennsylvania.

In 2003, actor John Ritter died six days before his 55th birthday in Burbank, California.

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